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IVORY-BILLS  LiVE???!  ...

=> THE blog devoted to news and commentary on the most iconic bird in American ornithology, the Ivory-billed Woodpecker (IBWO)... and... sometimes other schtuff.
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"....The truth is out there."

-- Dr. Jerome Jackson, 2002 (... & Agent Fox Mulder)

“There are more things in heaven and earth, Horatio, than are dreamt of in your philosophy.”

-- Hamlet

"All truth passes through 3 stages: First it is ridiculed. Second, it is violently opposed. Third, it is accepted as self-evident."

-- Arthur Schopenhauer






Friday, April 02, 2010

 

-- FIRST Ever Photo --

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....of a Santa Marta Sabrewing (very rare, endangered hummingbird) from Colombia here:

http://www.proaves.org/article.php?id_article=829

okay, not what you want, but still exciting.
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Comments:
Actually, I find that article to be very interesting. It's about a bird that exists. If such a small bird that lives in such dense forest at high elevations can be captured and photographed, it should be real easy to capture and/or photograph an IBW.

I sincerely hope that strong efforts are made to protect the habitat that hummingbird needs to survive.
 
According to birdlife.org, the Santa Marta Sabrewing population (2,500-9,999) is on the order of 500 times that of what is assumed for an extant Ivory-billed Woodpecker and occupies a much smaller range. That's alot more needles in a much smaller haystack, so the difficulty in photographing the Sabrewing doesn't necessarily support your conclusion that finding and photographing an Ivory-bill ought to be easy.
 
Ya know, it's very interesting that an estimate of 2500 to 9999 birds can be made when just a couple of weeks ago the alleged first ever photo was taken to confirm that the species even exists. It's also interesting that the estimate was made before the photo was taken.

After doing a little digging into that hummingbird, I found that confirmation has allegedly been made many times and that the bird "is fairly common" (according to National Geographic) in some areas.

I wonder if the same people who are researching the IBW are the ones researching that hummer. And doesn't it seem strange that the diagnostic tail feathers are not shown in the photo?

I'm beginning to doubt any and all records of birds by anyone, anywhere.
 
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